Assigning the Difficult Project
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Use Positive Words When Assigning the Difficult Project

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In every business or organization there are some assignments that everyone dreads.

Whether it's end of the year accounting exercises, new contract development or something in between, there are always tasks that are especially difficult and universally disliked.

By using positive words when communicating difficult assignments, and explaining the context in which the work takes place, employees are likely to feel more committed to the difficult work to be performed.

When an especially difficult project or task must be assigned, the default is to assign the work to employees who are highly productive and efficient. 

Doing this normally ensures that the task is done correctly the first time. Important, difficult tasks often require experience, knowledge, and dedication and simply can't be assigned to "just anyone".

By using positive words to communicate an assignment, the individuals assigned these difficult but important tasks can actually feel complimented. How can this be accomplished?

By letting the team member or members assigned the difficult project know that they were hand-picked because (assuming this is the case), they can be trusted to accomplish it on-time, within budget and accurately.

Situations that could easily turn into a morale-depleting problem can, through the use of positive words and proper explanation, become a morale-building situation.

f you're known for saying what you mean and not giving compliments too lightly, you will often find employees who step up to the plate and make an assignment a success because of the motivation provided by your positive approach and belief in their abilities.

Of course, positive words will not replace proper training, clear project definition and the availability of the proper equipment or other necessary assets.

Even the best employees can't accomplish a task unless they have the proper training or experience, have what is needed to do the job and understand exactly what the task entails.

Copyright © 2005 by Bill Roche.  All rights reserved.  All material on this site (www.TopResults.com) is protected by U.S. Federal Copyright law. It may not be reprinted in any form, or hosted on any Web site, without explicit permission.

 

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