Measuring Improvement
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Measuring Improvement Through Follow-Up Surveys

You've measured your employees' thoughts and feelings through employee surveys, analyzed the results and implemented action plans to effect change. Do you know if you made the right changes?

How can you tell?

After changes based on action plans have been implemented and in effect for some period of time, usually 6 months or more, a follow-up survey should be performed.

The questions on the follow-up survey should be identical to those on the initial survey; this will allow you to learn what has changed in the employees perceptions. It could be that you fixed something that wasn't important to your team members or that you fixed something in the wrong way and have actually made things worse. You won't know until you perform a follow-up survey!

When change is implemented, it takes some time for perceptions to change. If, as a result of employee dissatisfaction with recognition and rewards, an Employee of the Month Award implemented and for the past 6 months, an award with a cash reward has been issued to employees winning this award, you can be certain that the 6 employees who received the award will be satisfied with the new process.

What about the other employees; are they satisfied? Have you done enough or too little? Your follow-up survey will answer these questions.

Repeating employee surveys on satisfaction, engagement, development and other topics should be repeated on a regular basis. The atmosphere may have changed; the employee base changes over time. Cultural changes in the marketplace may have caused changes in your employees' perceptions of certain aspects of their jobs.

The value of employee surveys are well worth the time and effort to ensure you are providing a workplace that provides your team members personal and career satisfaction, career development and hope for the future.

Loyal, happy employees who are empowered to perform their jobs will produce a better bottom line and innovative ideas.

Stagnation will be held to a minimum and career burnout can be avoided.

All because you ask the employees to provide input and then act upon their responses and continue to measure improvement!

Copyright © 2005 by Bill Roche.  All rights reserved.  All material on this site (www.TopResults.com) is protected by U.S. Federal Copyright law. It may not be reprinted in any form, or hosted on any Web site, without explicit permission.

 

[Employee Morale] [Types of Surveys] [How to Develop Surveys] [Survey Results] [Action Plans] [Survey Logistics] [Interpreting Results] [Survey Introduction] [Measuring Change] [Survey Confidentiality] [Free Survey Update]

Copyright © 1998-2015 by The Executive Strqtegies Group LLC.  All rights reserved.  All material on this site (www.TopResults.com) is protected by U.S. Federal Copyright law. It may not be reprinted in any form, or hosted on any Web site, without prior written permission.